Thermo Fischer launches new benchtop centrifuge

New benchtop centrifuge incorporates hybrid rotor for application flexibility


The centrifuge is designed for simple operation, and it features a large, brightly lit display

Thermo Fisher Scientific has introduced Medifuge, a small benchtop centrifuge. The new benchtop centrifuge features a unique 2-in-1 hybrid rotor that has interchangeable fixed-angle and swinging buckets to facilitate quick and convenient switching between applications.

Rotor exchange can be time-consuming and expensive, particularly for researchers constantly alternating between sample vessels. When coupled with the Thermo Scientific DualSpin rotor, the versatile Thermo Scientific Medifuge small benchtop centrifuge provides the flexibility to perform several applications on a single platform.

The unique 2-in-1-rotor is designed to improve productivity and increase cost efficiencies by eliminating the need to exchange or purchase additional rotors, or even a different centrifuge, to meet the application demands of the lab. The Medifuge centrifuge incorporates safety and environmental sustainability features such as an emergency lid-lock release, in case of power failure; quiet operation at less than 56 dBA; and a lightweight composite rotor that is easy to handle and saves energy during acceleration/deceleration. The compact footprint makes this new benchtop centrifuge an ideal choice for labs with limited space.

The centrifuge is designed for simple operation, and it features a large, brightly lit display with intuitive controls and a fast one-click closure. The four customizable programs allow users to quickly run routine protocols, while three deceleration profiles - standard, soft and brake-off - are designed to provide optimal separation.

The centrifuge can accommodate a wide range of tubes, from 1.4 mL to 15 mL, with two spacer options, including clinical IVD blood tubes, gel tubes, standard syringes and conical tubes. Serum preparation can be done with the swinging buckets, which minimizes contamination risk, while cell pelleting, which often requires low g force, can be performed using the fixed-angle buckets. Researchers can also run both fixed-angle and swinging buckets at the same time for separation comparison studies.


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